OURS IS THE FURY

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My art

seizuresandchandeliers:

manticore-monster:

check-your-privilege-feminists:

Tumblr: spreading the world apart, one group at a time.

This is really what I hate when people throw around the word “culture appropriation” at people who do things from other cultures.

Yes I’m aware that certain things have a cultural significance to certain cultures (i.e. Native American headdresses), but when people say to others that they’re appropriating another person’s culture by either:

  • cooking food
  • wearing certain clothes
  • learning a language
  • celebrating another culture’s holiday

I remember seeing a post on my dash where someone was saying that they didn’t want to cook Japanese food because they thought they were appropriating it. The fuck is this bullshit.

Every time some SJW says shit like this, it sounds like everyone should be confined to their own cultures. No one learn about other cultures. Stay in your own country. Be fucking ignorant. 

Just. Shut the fuck up. 

Oh thank you for this post tumblr. In a year this has probably become my biggest pet peeve.

(via obvious--bicycles)

50shadezofcarter:

I text back embarrassingly fast

or three hours later

there is no in between

(Source: 50shadezofcarter, via combusken)

I could always tell my dad hated me. As a kid, my bath toys were a toaster and a radio.
— Tyrion Lannister, A Game of Thrones  (via incorrectgotquotes)

officialunitedstates:

things that make sense in physics

  • inclined plane
  • pulley
  • screw

things that should not be working but do anyway

  • a gun firing even though there is no power source
  • fridge making things cold when its power source is electricity which is hot
  • magnets
  • leap years
  • how come we haven’t deciphered any animals language completely yet
  • megaphones being loud

canonqueer:

*procrastinates doing things I love for an unknown reason*

(via a-whole-thing-of-candy-beans)

sibellahallward:

My favorite thing about Sweeney Todd is that they come up with their evil plan and then just make puns about it for 10 minutes and that’s the act one finale

(Source: gabrielladysquith, via messofajess)


you want this bag u piece of shit
View high resolution

you want this bag u piece of shit

(Source: flopculturewhore, via curlyclodagh)

tentacletherapissed:

sagihairius:

tinychatter:

i love when people call me precious thats such a cute thing to call somebody

yeah it does have a nice
ring to it

image

(via a-whole-thing-of-candy-beans)

twooping:

You could’ve reblogged that from me

image

(via bowdowntomama)

allthingslinguistic:

xkcd: Wikipedia article titles with the right syllable stress pattern to be sung to the tune of the original Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles theme song. (Here’s the song, for reference.)
All of these titles are examples of trochaic tetrameter, which is one of the most common English meters (a trochee is a foot consisting of STRONG-weak and tetrameter is four feet per line). Another example is Twinkle Twinkle Little Star, although that has a deficient last foot, but you can sing any of these titles to that tune as well if you just double the last note.
Trochaic tetrameter creates a strong feeling of sing-song “poem-ness” in English. Most Shakespearean characters, for example, speak in iambic pentameter (weak-STRONG, five feet per line), which sounds more natural, but a few speak in trochaic tetrameter for dramatic effect. For example, MacBeth and Lady MacBeth speak in iambic pentameter, which gives the effect of talking normally: 

Methought I heard a voice cry “Sleep no more!Macbeth does murder sleep,” the innocent sleep,Sleep that knits up the ravell’d sleave of care,
Out, damned spot! out, I say!—One: two: why,then, ‘tis time to do’t.—Hell is murky!—Fie, mylord, fie! a soldier, and afeard? What need wefear who knows it, when none can call our powerto account?—Yet who would have thought the oldman to have had so much blood in him?

But the witches speak in trochaic tetrameter, which makes them seem like they’re delivering an incantation: 

Double, double toil and trouble;Fire burn, and cauldron bubble.
Fair is foul, and foul is fair

Previous xkcd on poetry: metrical foot fetish, ballad meter, trochaic fixation. Language Log also has a long, interesting post on meter.  View high resolution

allthingslinguistic:

xkcd: Wikipedia article titles with the right syllable stress pattern to be sung to the tune of the original Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles theme song. (Here’s the song, for reference.)

All of these titles are examples of trochaic tetrameter, which is one of the most common English meters (a trochee is a foot consisting of STRONG-weak and tetrameter is four feet per line). Another example is Twinkle Twinkle Little Star, although that has a deficient last foot, but you can sing any of these titles to that tune as well if you just double the last note.

Trochaic tetrameter creates a strong feeling of sing-song “poem-ness” in English. Most Shakespearean characters, for example, speak in iambic pentameter (weak-STRONG, five feet per line), which sounds more natural, but a few speak in trochaic tetrameter for dramatic effect. For example, MacBeth and Lady MacBeth speak in iambic pentameter, which gives the effect of talking normally: 

Methought I heard a voice cry “Sleep no more!
Macbeth does murder sleep,” the innocent sleep,
Sleep that knits up the ravell’d sleave of care,

Out, damned spot! out, I say!—One: two: why,
then, ‘tis time to do’t.—Hell is murky!—Fie, my
lord, fie! a soldier, and afeard? What need we
fear who knows it, when none can call our power
to account?—Yet who would have thought the old
man to have had so much blood in him?

But the witches speak in trochaic tetrameter, which makes them seem like they’re delivering an incantation: 

Double, double toil and trouble;
Fire burn, and cauldron bubble.

Fair is foul, and foul is fair

Previous xkcd on poetry: metrical foot fetish, ballad meter, trochaic fixation. Language Log also has a long, interesting post on meter